Film Review: Last Laugh

★★★☆☆ – What the film lacks in medium it makes up for in content, providing a micro-budgeted look at family fun and heartache in equal measure.

It’s clear from the outset that Last Laugh has been made on an amateur budget, and whilst that’s not always a bad thing, there’s a problem with quality that’s hard to ignore. An occasionally overbearing soundtrack and subpar picture can detract from what at its core is a charming comedy.

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Daphne and Velma are getting their own live action film… fighting zombies?

Have you ever thought “Hey, I’d really like to see the women of the Scooby Doo star in a live action zombie movie”? No? Well luckily for you, Ashley Tisdale has.

That’s right, the ex-Disney star has utilised her own production company with sister Jennifer (aptly named Blondie Girl productions) to create the Scooby Doo spin off that no one knew they needed until hearing the ridiculous concept. And, with a team of Sarah Jeffery as Velma and Sarah Gilman as Daphne, the fever dream only gets better and better.

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Emily Blunt finds herself A Quiet Place to hide in latest trailer

Emily Blunt’s latest film shows that silence is not only golden, but entirely necessary for survival.

Hiding out in a remote cabin in the wilderness, a family of four seem to live an idyllic lifestyle. Living off the land, playing board games, and eating dinner together, all seems in perfect harmony – except for one thing. Everything is done entirely in silence.

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Thelma releases electrifying opening scene

Joachim Trier’s critically acclaimed Thelma, debuting at Toronto Film festival and already earning a nomination for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2018 Academy Awards, has now released its opening scene online.

With categorisation ranging from horror and science fiction to thriller and drama, it’s safe to say the Norwegian hit is in a genre all of its own. The narrative follows shy young Thelma (Eili Harboe), a college student that has broken free of her religious family to study in the metropolitan Oslo. Soon, she starts to suffer seizures, and coincidentally becomes increasingly infatuated with the beautiful Anja (Kaya Wilkins).

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The Midnight Man plays on your worst nightmares in debut trailer

Creepypastas from all corners of the internet are getting their screen debut, and The Midnight Man is no different.

Following Alex (Gabrielle Haugh) as she looks after her grandmother in a suitably creepy house, the story begins with the discovery of a long-forgotten game in the attic. Much like Jumangi, the fun is soon lost when the terrifyingly true nature of what the game entails come to light, but differs from the jungle board game in that there’s far less monkeys. Oh, and playing can result in lethal consequences.

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Film Review: The Road to Mandalay

★★★☆☆ – Whilst very slow, the film’s ending pushes all previous notions of boredom to one side, and makes use of the dark tone perpetuated throughout.

Describing The Road to Mandalay as a ‘slow-burner’ feels almost inappropriate. There’s slow, and then there’s stagnated – which Midi Z’s film runs the risk of falling into with each stilted scene during the first hour or so. Using elongated silences and subtlety to convey meaning rather than outright action, his filming style is appropriate for its subject matter; but can often times feel flat and dis-interesting instead of thoughtful.

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Film Review: The Tiger: An Old Hunter’s Tale

★★★★☆ – Not necessarily enjoyable but entirely gripping, this film is a testament to Korean cinema, balancing duty and emotion with a deft hand.

As devastating as it is beautiful, The Tiger: An Old Hunters Tale is a face-off of epic proportions. Walking the line between life and death too many times to count, Hoon-jung Park has crafted a truly touching insight into an old hunter’s life, and the relationship he shares with the Lord of the Mountain – a giant Korean tiger.

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